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About me

Senior Fellow at the Center on Democracy, Development and Rule of Law (CDDRL) and Director of the Center for Latin American Studies at Stanford University. His research interests include federalism, poverty relief, indigenous governance, political economy of health, violence and citizen security in Mexico and Latin America. He is author of Federalism, Fiscal Authority and Centralization in Latin America (Cambridge, reedited 2016) and coauthor with Federico Estévez and Beatriz Magaloni of The Political Logic of Poverty Relief (Cambridge, 2016), as well as numerous journal articles and book chapters. He is currently working on a project on the developmental legacies of colonial rule and governance in indigenous communities in Mexico and is the co-PI (with Beatriz Magaloni) of the project Citizen Trust and Evidence-Based Police Accountability and Professionalization in Mexico.

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Investigador en el Centro para el Desarrollo la Democracia y el Estado de Derecho, así como el Director del Centro de Estudios Latinoamericanos de la Universidad de Stanford. Sus áreas de interés incluyen federalismo, alivio a la pobreza, gobernanza indígena, la economía política de la salud, violencia y seguridad ciudadana en México y Latinoamérica. Es autor del libro Federalism, Fiscal Authority and Centralization in Latin America (Cambridge, reeditado 2016) y coautor (con Federico Estévez y Beatriz Magaloni) del libro The Political Logic of Poverty Relief (Cambridge, 2016), así como múltiples artículos en revistas y otros volumenes. Actualmente trabaja en un proyecto sobre los legados de desarrollo del régimen y la gobernanza colonial sobre las comunidades indígenas en México y es co-Investigador Principal (con Beatriz Magaloni) del proyecto Citizen Trust and Evidence-Based Police Accountability and Professionalization in Mexico.

CV (en inglés) aqui

Persistent Voices: Domestic Workers and Indigenous Households in Mexico City

This slideshow presents preliminary fi ndings of an ongoing study of the persistence of indigenous identity and domestic workers in Mexico City. Reconstructing the demography of the little known census of 1890, together with cartographic geocoding at the city block level (manzana), the paper provides evidence of a spatially concentrated pattern of employment for domestic workers in the municipality of Mexico City in the 19th century. The analysis confi rms a long term practice of ethnic labor specialization in home and caregiving activities. Women employees, most of them indigenous, came to represent almost half of the composition of rich households. The social con figuration of household employees continued to characterize richer neighborhoods of the City well into the 1970s (live-in employees in the homes of the rich and upper middle class). The paper moves into the present geolocating the indigenous households in the downtown area of Mexico City (disaggregating the 2010 census ethnic identi ers at the city block level). I show that indigenous households in downtown Mexico City live in a few concentrated clusters of city blocks. These spatially segregated pockets of indigenous families are distinct from both the household employees living in non-indigenous homes, or the waves of indigenous immigration settling in the periphery of the metropolitan area. The analysis shows that indigenous inhabitants living today in those downtown areas are located in close proximity to the indigenous palaces (Tecpan) of 16th century Mexico-Tenochtitlan. Since the Tecpan represented loci of autonomy and judicial adjudication, the last remnants of indigenous political power in the City, I interpret these findings as a manifestation of indigenous agency and empowerment, an echo of voices that were never silenced. The paper concludes with a discussion of the persistent legacies of indigenous identity and domestic employees on wage inequality, racial discrimination, punitive criminal enforcement, as well as some speculative thoughts on political polarization and attitudes towards redistribution by the rich and the middle class.

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Whispers of Silenced Voices: The Survival of Indigenous Linguistic Distinctiveness in Mexico City